For any country popular with tourists and travellers, there are certain landmarks and attractions that are considered must-see, especially when visiting for the first time. For Australia the list is extensive, but it’s fair to say Sydney Opera House, Bondi Beach, the Great Barrier Reef and Uluru National Park (home to Ayers rock) would all spring to mind, to name but a few.

However, like most countries, there are countless lesser-known towns, cities, buildings and natural wonders that are worthy of your attention. Australia contains enough to write a dozen blogs on, but let’s start with these five for now:

King’s Canyon, Northern Territory

King’s Canyon, Australia

Australia’s Red Centre is best known for being the home of Ayers Rock, but just three hours or so drive away is King’s Canyon, located in the Watarrka National Park. Whereas Ayers rock’s natural beauty is best admired from afar, King’s Canyon is almost an adventure playground in comparison, with 100m-high sandstone walls and palm-filled crevices that are waiting to be explored. There’s a 6km Rim Walk which boasts magnificent views of the Canyon rim, the weathered domes of ‘The Lost City’ and the ‘Garden of Eden’. It can also be navigated by four-wheel drive tracks, camel tours and for those looking to take in the grandeur in all its glory there are helicopter tours available from the Kings Canyon Resort.


Undara Volcanic National Park, Queensland

Undara Volcanic National Park, Queensland

Situated in the heart of the Gulf Savannah country in northern Queensland, the Undara Lava Tubes are a sight to behold. When the volcano disgorged itself 190,000 years ago, it produced enough lava to fill Sydney Harbour three times over. Lava rivers were formed as it flowed across the land, and as these hardened over time, and the molten rock below drained away, enormous tunnels were created. Today, these are the volcanic trails which you can explore with a guide, taking in the geological marvels surrounding you. And look out for bats exiting the caves at sunset! Other activities within the park include hiking, bike trails and walking the perimeter of an extinct volcano.


Flinders Ranges and Lake Eyre, South Australia

Flinders Ranges and Lake Eyre, South Australia

When you think of the Australian outback you tend to consider the desert regions of Western Australia and the Northern Territory, but South Australia has its own uninhabited landscapes to rival anything you will find in other parts of the country. The Flinders Range is the perfect example of this; the harsh beauty of the outback laid bare in all its glory. A far cry from the well-worn tourist trails surrounding Uluru, the Ranges are home to the overgrown remains of abandoned properties and Aboriginal rock art alike.

Lake Eyre, Australia’s lowest point and largest lake, lies approximately 390km north of the Flinders Ranges and is an oasis in the harsh desert when full. It retains its beauty all year round as it’s transformed into a vast salt flat in drier times. Take in its splendour with four-wheel driving, camping or flying overhead.


Milk Beach, New South Wales

Milk Beach, New South Wales

Far removed from the hustle and bustle of Sydney’s popular beaches yet with fantastic views of the Harbour Bridge and city skyline, Milk Beach is quite literally a hidden gem. Located in the eastern suburb of Vaucluse, it’s one of a few little beaches you’ll discover along the Hermitage Foreshore walking track. It’s an ideal place to snorkel, fish or just relax with a picnic.

For those who like to burn the candle at both ends, Milk Beach offers you the chance to let your hair down with summer parties bringing hundreds of people onto the sand and in the water. Animal floaties are a must-bring accessory and the yachts provide the music.


Gunlom Falls, Northern Territory

Gunlom Falls, Northern Territory

Kakadu National Park is the home to this magical combination of waterfall and serene plunge pool. Make the steep climb to the top of the waterfall, take a relaxing dip in the crystal-clear pools and take in the breath-taking scenery that surrounds you. For views of the southern hills and ridges, and access to the rock pools, take the steep lookout walk, but make sure you watch your step. An easier walk to Murrill Billabong offers great bird watching opportunities. There’s a shaded grass area to retreat to for a spot of lunch or set up camp for the night.

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